How Can Recycled Water Benefit Us

Recycled water can satisfy most water demands, as long as it is adequately treated to ensure water quality appropriate for the use. Figure 1 shows types of treatment processes and suggested uses at each level of treatment. In uses where there is a greater chance of human exposure to the water, more treatment is required. As for any water source that is not properly treated, health problems could arise from drinking or being exposed to recycled water if it contains disease-causing organisms or...

What Is Water Recycling

Recycle verb l.a.To recover useful materials from garbage or waste. b. To extract and reuse. While recycling is a term generally applied to aluminum cans, glass bottles, and newspapers, water can be recycled as well. Water recycling is reusing treated wastewater for beneficial purposes such as agricultural and landscape irrigation, industrial processes, toilet flushing, and replenishing a ground water basin (referred to as ground water recharge). Water is sometimes recycled and reused onsite...

Water recycling can decrease diversion of freshwater from sensitive ecosystems

Plants, wildlife, and fish depend on sufficient water flows to their habitats to live and reproduce. The lack of adequate flow, as a result of diversion for agricultural, urban, and industrial purposes, can cause dete rio ration of water qual ity and ecosystem health. Water users can sup ple ment their demands by using recycled water, which can free considerable amounts of water for the environment and increase flows to vital ecosystems. Copyright 1994, Mono Lake Committee In California, Mono...

What Is The Future Of Water Recycling

Water recycling has proven to be effective and successful in creating a new and reliable water supply, while not compromising public health. Nonpotable reuse is a widely accepted practice that will continue to grow. However, in many parts of the United States, the uses of recycled water are expanding in order to ac commo date the needs of the envi ron ment and growing water supply demands. Advances in wastewater treatment technology and health studies of indirect potable reuse have led many to...

Water recycling decreases discharge to sensitive water bodies

In some cases, the impetus for water recycling comes not from a water supply need, but from a need to eliminate or decrease wastewater discharge to the ocean, an estuary, or a stream. For example, high volumes of treated wastewater discharged from the San Jose Santa Clara Water Pollution Control Plant into the south San Francisco Bay threatened the area's natural salt water marsh. In response, a 140 million recycling project was completed in 1997. The South Bay Water Recycling Program Incline...

Water recycling can reduce and prevent pollution

Gallo Vineyards Photos

When pollutant discharges to oceans, rivers, and other water bodies are curtailed, the pollutant loadings to these bodies are decreased. Moreover, in some cases, substances that can be pollutants when discharged to a body of water can be beneficially reused for irrigation. For example, recycled water may contain higher levels of nutrients, such as nitrogen, than potable water. Application of recycled water for agricultural and landscape irrigation can provide an additional source of nutrients...